N2O losses from a long-term compost amended soil

Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a trace gas of high ecological relevance because of its catalytic effect on ozone depletion in the stratosphere and its contribution to the global greenhouse effect. About 70 % of the annual global anthropogenic N2O emission derives from agriculture (animal and crop production) (Mosier, 2001). One of the most important sources for N2O is microbial transformation in soil (nitrification, denitrification). Essential factors affecting the formation of nitrous oxide in soil are the availability of oxygen (aeration, water logging), nitrogen (NH4 and NO3 from mineralization and fertilization), and carbon. Therefore usually higher N2O emissions are measured on soils after long-term application of organic fertilizers (Kilian et al., 1998; Mogge et al., 1999; Kaiser and Ruser, 2000). Due to differences in content and quality of organic matter (C/N ratio, degree of humification), compost application, compared with slurry, leads to a higher humus accumulation in soil.. In two field experiments described by Kilian et al. (1998) it was investigated, whether these differences in organic matter effect the N2O emission.

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Titel N2O losses from a long-term compost amended soil
Medien Seminar Proceedings: "Applying Compost – Benefits and Needs", Brussels, 22. - 23. November 2001
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Verfasser/Herausgeber Prof. Dr. Thomas Ebertseder, Reinhold Gutser, Armin Kilian
Seiten 87-90
Veröffentlichungsdatum 31.12.2003
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Zitation Ebertseder, T.; Gutser, R.; Kilian, A. (2003): N2O losses from a long-term compost amended soil. Seminar Proceedings: "Applying Compost – Benefits and Needs", Brussels, 22. - 23. November 2001, S. 87-90.